Dental Tribune Europe
Clinical
Torsional resistance of two nickel-titanium rotary instruments: A comparative study

August 19, 2019

This study explores how heat treatment less significantly influences (increasing or decreasing) torsional resistance when compared to the high increase in flexibility and fatigue resistance reported in many published articles. Moreover, torsional fracture occurs extremely rapidly when an instrument’s tip becomes blocked.

Orthograde apical application of an MTA plug in a tooth without constriction

October 8, 2018

The minor apical foramen should be maintained at its initial position and size after chemomechanical endodontic procedures. If the apical constriction is breached and transported, cleaning procedures will be compromised and obturation significantly difficult to carry out well.

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A short history of the NiTi file revolution

May 24, 2016

Nowhere in dentistry is technical progress as rapid as it is in modern endodontics. The development of flexible nickel-titanium (NiTi) files in the late 1980s created entirely new and hitherto unknown opportunities in the mechanical preparation of root canals. The following article gives a descriptive explanation of the decisive technical differences between a conventional file system and the latest generation of instruments. Employing a number of different scenarios, the article examines the opportunities available to ENDO specialists and beginners through the smart application of modular NiTi systems in different treatment situations.

Endodontic retreatment and adhesive restoration of structurally compromised second premolar

September 13, 2013

In light of the scientific literature concerning the outcome of the endodontic treatment, it doesn’t sound inappropriate that the restoration of the endocoronal complex has to be completed by the endodontist.(1) In this context the following report presents a complete rehabilitation of a second premolar, including retreatment and definitive restoration. Teeth that need retreatment are most often grossly decayed due to caries, fracture and/or previous restoration.

Removal of a fractured instrument: Two case reports

May 31, 2011

Fractured instruments pose a challenge to every endodontist. The difficulty in the retrieval of these instruments ranges from surprisingly easy to downright impossible. The clinical outcome of cases with fractured instruments depends on several factors, such as the position of the instrument in the canal, the type of material, the instrument size and canal anatomy.¹ Failure in retrieval of the fractured instrument does not automatically result in failure of the case.² One can still try to bypass the instrument, choose a surgical approach, or even wait and see. However, if we bear ‘nothing ventured, nothing gained’ in mind, then we should always at least try to retrieve the fractured instrument.

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