Dental Tribune Europe
Clinical
Zygomatic dynamic navigation: New challenges and possibilities

June 21, 2021

The presence of sufficient bone volume is one of the most important criteria for successful osseointegration of implants,1 wherefore restoration of atrophied edentulous maxillae poses a great dilemma for the surgeon and restorative dentist. Sinus bone grafting to build new bone for implant anchorage in atrophied jaws entails multiple surgical interventions and has varying implant success rates, high potential for donor site morbidity and increased surgical costs.2, 3 A major breakthrough came when Brånemark first used custom-designed, longer implants inserted into the zygomatic bone in support of a craniofacial prosthesis in the 1980s.4 When used in the treatment of maxillary atrophy,5, 6 zygomatic implants present a graftless alternative.

Full-mouth restoration with immediate loading in the upper jaw

October 11, 2019

Rehabilitating both jaws of a patient with a poor oral situation is already a challenge in itself. But we wanted to go even further by trying immediate loading using Straumann BLX implants, which are excellent for this kind of work because of their macro-geometry.

advertisement
Conventional and immediate loading with final n!ce screw-retained crowns

September 4, 2019

Thanks to the very high accuracy of modern intra-oral scanners, excellent design software and reliable production systems, restoring an implant with a chairside model is now a reliable treatment with numerous advantages for the patient. The same-day solution with final materials produces excellent implant crowns in a chairside environment.

3-D Virtual Planning Concepts: Maxillary Implant Supported Removable or Fixed Prostheses

July 21, 2015

“Pre-surgical prosthetic planning” can be defined as the process of accumulating diagnostic information to determine which course of treatment should be considered for the fully edentate patient. The first step in patient evaluation should include conventional periapical radiographs, panoramic radiographs, oral examination, and mounted, articulated study casts. In the completely edentulous patient it is essential for the clinician to assess several important aspects of the individual anatomical presentation including vertical dimension of occlusion, lip support, phonetics, smile line, over-jet, overbite, ridge contours, and a basic understanding of the underlying bone structures. The accumulation of preliminary data afforded by conventional diagnostics provides a foundation to prepare a course of treatment for the patient. However, if the review of findings is based upon a two-dimensional panoramic radiograph, it may not be accurate in appreciating the true spatial positioning of vital structures such as the incisal canal, the floor of the nose, or the maxillary sinus. To fully understand each individual patient’s actual bone anatomy, it is essential that clinicians adopt an innovative set of virtual, threedimensional tools.

© 2021 - All rights reserved - Dental Tribune International